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THe King’s Speech

The winners of the Directors Guild of America Outstanding Directorial Achievement Awards for 2010 were announced over the weekend and Tom Hooper won the DGA’s Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for The King’s Speech.

The DGA’s Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film has traditionally served as a near-perfect barometer for the Academy Award for Best Director. Only six times since the DGA Award’s inception in 1948 has the winner not gone on to receive the Academy Award for Best Director.

The winners of the 2010 Directors Guild of America Awards for Outstanding Directorial Achievement are:

FEATURE FILM

TOM HOOPER
The King’s Speech
(The Weinstein Co.)

This is Mr. Hooper’s first DGA Award and second DGA Award nomination. He was previously nominated for the DGA Award for Movies for Television/Miniseries for John Adams in 2008.

MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES

MICK JACKSON
Temple Grandin
(HBO)

This is Mr. Jackson’s fourth DGA Award, making him a four-time winner of the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Movies for Television and Mini-Series with previous wins for Indictment: The McMartin Trial (1995), Tuesdays With Morrie (1999), and Live From Baghdad (2002).

DOCUMENTARY

CHARLES FERGUSON
Inside Job
Representational Pictures
Sony Pictures Classics

This is Mr. Ferguson’s first DGA Award.

DRAMATIC SERIES

MARTIN SCORSESE
Boardwalk Empire, “Boardwalk Empire”
(HBO)

This is Mr. Scorsese’s second DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement and eighth DGA Award nomination. He won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film in 2006 for The Departed, and was previously nominated in that category for Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), Goodfellas (1990), The Age of Innocence (1993), Gangs of New York (2002), and The Aviator (2004). In 1999 Scorsese was presented with the Filmmaker Award at the inaugural DGA Honors Gala and he won the DGA’s highest artistic honor, the Lifetime Achievement Award (for distinguished achievement in film direction) in 2003.

COMEDY SERIES

MICHAEL SPILLER
Modern Family, “Halloween”
(ABC)

This is Mr. Spiller’s first DGA Award.

MUSICAL VARIETY

GLENN WEISS
64th Annual Tony Awards
(CBS)

This is Mr. Weiss’ second DGA Award and seventh DGA Award nomination. He won the Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Musical Variety in 2007 for The 61st Annual Tony Awards; and was previously nominated in this category in 2008, 2006, 2005, 2002 and 2001 all for the 62nd, 60th, 59th, 56th and 55th Annual Tony Awards.

REALITY PROGRAMS

EYTAN KELLER
The Next Iron Chef, “Episode #301”
(Food Network)

This is Mr. Keller’s first DGA Award and second DGA Award Nomination. He was previously nominated in this same category in 2009 for episode “201” of The Next Iron Chef.

DAYTIME SERIALS

LARRY CARPENTER
One Life to Live, “Starr X’d Lovers, The Musical, Part Two”
(ABC)

This is Mr. Carpenter’s third DGA Award and seventh DGA Award nomination and all for his direction of One Life to Live. He won the Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Daytime Serials Award for One Life to Live – “Episode #9947” in 2007, for “Episode #8849” in 2003, and for “So You Think You Can Be Shane Morasco’s Father” in 2008. He was previously nominated for that series for “Episode #9686” in 2006, “Episode #9385” in 2005 and “Episode #8655” in 2002.

COMMERCIALS

STACY WALL
(Imperial Woodpecker)

Rise, Nike – Wieden & Kennedy/Portland

Really?, Microsoft – Crispin Porter & Bogusky/Boulder

Slim Chin & D Rose, Adidas – 180LA

Handshake, Nike – Wieden & Kennedy/Portland

This is Mr. Wall’s first DGA Award.

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS

ERIC BROSS
The Boy Who Cried Werewolf
(Nickelodeon)

This is Mr. Bross’ first DGA Award.

The DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film has traditionally been one of the industry’s most accurate barometers for who will win the Best Director Academy Award.

Only six times since the DGA Awards began in 1948 has the Feature Film winner not gone on to win the corresponding Academy Award.

The six exceptions are as follows:

  • 1968: Anthony Harvey won the DGA Award for The Lion in Winter while Carol Reed took home the Oscar® for Oliver!
  • 1972: Francis Ford Coppola received the DGA’s nod for The Godfather while the Academy selected Bob Fosse for Cabaret.
  • 1985: Steven Spielberg received his first DGA Award for The Color Purple while the Oscar® went to Sydney Pollack for Out of Africa.
  • 1995: Ron Howard was chosen by the DGA for his direction of Apollo 13 while Academy voters selected Mel Gibson for Braveheart.
  • 2000: Ang Lee won the DGA Award for his direction of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon while Steven Soderbergh won the Academy Award for Traffic.
  • 2002: Rob Marshall won the DGA Award for Chicago at the 55th Annual DGA Awards while Roman Polanski received the Academy Award for The Pianist.
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