HOGTOWN, Daniel Nearing
HOGTOWN, Daniel Nearing

The 24th African Diaspora International Film Festival dates have just been set to November 25 to December 11, 2016 with screenings in New York City, to be held at Columbia University, Teachers College, the Cinépolis Chelsea and at MIST Harlem. ADIFF 2016 will present over 50 films from more than 20 countries.

Already selected as one of the highlights of this year’s festival is Hogtown by Daniel Nearing. Described by the Chicago Sun-Times as “The most original film made in Chicago about Chicago to date,” Hogtown is an experimental, beautifully shot murder mystery set in 1919, against the backdrop of the Chicago race riots of that year.

Chicago Tribune Reporter Michael Phillips writes: “Writer-director Daniel Nearing’s Hogtown is this week’s film to see. It’s a film expressing a sophisticated ambivalence about our city and its history of race, corruption, literary giants and ordinary, everyday poets. Hogtown unfolds in the months leading up to the 1919 Chicago “race riots,” following an African American police detective (Herman Wilkins) searching for a missing white theater owner whom, we’re told, was not happy with “the rise of the women, the Jews and the darkies.”” Lead actor Herman Wilkins gives an astounding performance in the role of Detective Deandre Son Carter in the film.

HOGTOWN is set in 1919 Chicago against the backdrop of the race riots of that year. The film follows an investigation into the disappearance of a millionaire theatre owner during a snowstorm. It is a murder mystery and a love story that celebrates the most American of American cities while exploring the intimate lives of many of its people. The period piece is in many ways a period-less piece, shot in black and white in the often undisguised contemporary city. The film involves a multi-racial, ensemble cast of more than 70 characters, a full symphony orchestra score, and evolves directly from the ensemble process of the making of the producers’ previous feature, Chicago Heights, which was named to Roger Ebert’s list of the Best Art Films of 2010.

Share this article ...

Tags