Chicago International Film Festival

NAME OF FESTIVAL: Chicago International Film Festival

SINCE: 1964

WHERE: Chicago, Illinois, USA

ABOUT THE FESTIVAL

The Chicago International Film Festival is the longest-running competitive film festival in North America. The Festival was started in 1964 by filmmaker and graphic artist Michael Kutza to provide an alternative to the commercial Hollywood movies that dominated the city's theaters. The Festival opened in 1965 at the Carnegie Theater, where King Vidor, Bette Davis, and Stanley Kramer were honored for their contributions to American cinema. Since then, the Festival has grown to become a world-renowned annual event. The Festival is dedicated to fostering better understanding between cultures and to making a positive contribution to the art form of the moving image.

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Chicago International Film Festival Announces First Films for 2013

Chicago International Film Festival Announces First Films for 2013

The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and PeteThe Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete 

The Chicago International Film Festival announced the first 21 feature-length and short films, a preview of the more than 150 films that will be presented during the 49th edition of the festival taking place October 10 – 24, 2013.  Films include THE INEVITABLE DEFEAT OF MISTER AND PETE directed by George Tillman which follows 13-year-old Mister whose mother, played by Chicago native Jennifer Hudson, is apprehended by the police, leaving Mister and his nine-year-old brother Pete alone to forage for food while dodging child protective services and the destructive scenarios of the projects. 

Le Havre Takes The Top Film Prize at the 2011 Chicago International Film Festival

Le Havre Takes The Top Film Prize at the 2011 Chicago International Film Festival

Le Havre

Le Havre, Finland’s official submission for 2012 Academy Awards – Best Foreign Language Film, topped a lineup of more than 180 feature-length fiction films, documentaries and shorts to win the top prize, the Gold Hugo at the 47th Chicago International Film Festival Competitions. Directed by Aki Kaurismäki, “in this warmhearted portrait of the French harbor city that gives the film its name, fate throws young African refugee Idrissa (Blondin Miguel) into the path of Marcel Marx (André Wilms), a well-spoken bohemian who works as a shoeshiner. With innate optimism and the unwavering support of his community, Marcel stands up to officials doggedly pursuing the boy for deportation. A political fairy tale that exists somewhere between the reality of contemporary France and the classic cinema of Jean-Pierre Melville and Marcel Carné, Le Havre is a charming, deadpan delight.” Le Havre opens in LA and NYC on October 21.

The complete list of winners of the 2011 Chicago International Film Festival. {jathumbnail off}

Academy Awards $450,000 to U.S. Film Festivals in 2011

Academy Awards $450,000 to U.S. Film Festivals in 2011

The Academy Foundation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has awarded $450,000 to 30 U.S. film festivals for the 2011 calendar year, Festival Grants Committee Chair Buffy Shutt announced today. The Chicago International Film Festival will be the recipient of a multiyear grant for its World Cinema Spotlight program. It will receive a total of $150,000 over a three-year period. The Nashville Film Festival and the New Orleans Film Festival are each […]

46th Chicago International Film Festival Award Winners

46th Chicago International Film Festival Award Winners

Michael Kutza, Founder and Artistic Director of the Chicago International Film Festival, Mimi Plauché, Head of Programming, and Associate Programmers Joel Hoglund and Penny Bartlett proudly announce the winners of the 46th Chicago International Film Festival competitions. The Festival’s highest honor is the Gold Hugo, named after the mythological God of Discovery. International Feature Film Competition Gold Hugo for Best Film to HOW I ENDED THE SUMMER (Russia) for the brilliantly acted and dynamically staged […]